FAECES, BLOOD IN THE
FALLOPIAN TUBE
or irritable bowel syndrome.
Enteritis,
dysentery,
or a tumour of the intestine
(see
intestine, tumours
of) may result in
excess mucus, which is often accom-
panied by blood.
Blood in the faeces differs in appear-
ance depending on the site of bleeding.
Bleeding from the stomach or duode-
num is usually passed in the form of
black, tarry faeces. Blood from the colon
is red and is usually passed at the same
time as the faeces. Bleeding from the
rectum or anus, which may be due to
tumours or to
haemorrhoids
, is usually
bright red. (See also
rectal bleeding.)
faeces, blood in the
See
faeces, abnor-
mal; rectal bleeding.
Fahrenheit scale
A temperature scale
in which the melting point of ice is 32°
and the boiling point of water is
212
°.
On this scale, normal body temperature
is 98.4°F, which is the equivalent of 37°
Celsius (C). To convert a Fahrenheit tem-
perature to Celsius, subtract 32 and
multiply by 0.56 (or 5/9). To convert a
Celsius temperature to Fahrenheit, mul-
tiply by 1.8 (or 9/5) then add 32. (See
also
Celsius scale
.)
failure to thrive
Failure of expected
growth in an infant or toddler, usually
assessed by comparing the rate at
which a baby gains weight with a stan-
dardized growth chart. An undiagnosed
illness such as a urinary infection may
be the cause. Emotional or physical
deprivation can also cause failure to
thrive. A child who fails to grow at the
appropriate rate needs tests to deter-
mine the cause.
fainting
Temporary loss of conscious-
ness due to reduced blood flow to the
brain. Episodes of fainting are usually
preceded by sweating, nausea, dizzi-
ness, and weakness, and are commonly
caused by pain, stress, shock, a stuffy
atmosphere, or prolonged coughing. An
episode may also result from postural
hypotension
, which may occur when a
person stands still for a long time or
suddenly stands up. This is common in
the elderly, in people with
diabetes mel-
litus
, and in those on
antihypertensive
drugs
or
vasodilator drugs.
In most cases, recovery from fainting
occurs when normal blood flow to the
brain is restored. This restoration usu-
ally happens within minutes because the
loss of consciousness results in the per-
son falling into a lying position, which
restores the flow of blood to the brain.
Medical attention should be sought for
prolonged
unconsciousness
or repeated
attacks of fainting.
faith-healing
The supposed ability of
certain people to cure disease by a
healing force inexplicable to science.
falciparum malaria
The most severe
form of
malaria
, caused by the parasitic
protozoan
PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM.
fallen arches
A cause of
flat-feet
. Fallen
arches can develop as a result of weak-
ness of the muscles that support the
arches of the foot.
fallopian tube
One of the 2 tubes that
extend from the
uterus
to the
ovary
. The
fallopian tube transports eggs and sperm
and is where
fertilization
takes place.
FALLOPIAN TUBE
Fallopian
tube
Uterus
Vagina
LOCATION
Ovary
The tube opens into the uterus at one
end, and the other end, which is divided
into fimbriae (finger-like projections),
lies close to the ovary. The tube has
muscular walls lined by cells with cilia
(hair-like projections). The fimbriae take
up the egg after it is expelled from the
ovary. The beating cilia and muscular
contractions propel the egg towards the
uterus. After intercourse, sperm swim
up the fallopian tube from the uterus.
The lining of the tube and its secretions
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