-ITIS
IVU
Specific treatment for itching depends on
the underlying cause. Cooling lotions,
such as
calamine
,
relieve irritation; emol-
lients reduce dryness.
-itis
A suffix meaning “inflammation of”.
Virtually every organ or tissue in the body
can suffer inflammation, so “itis” is by
far the most common word ending in
medicine. Examples of its use are bron-
chitis (inflammation of the bronchi) and
hepatitis (inflammation of the liver).
itraconazole
A type of
antifungal drug
.
IUCD
An abbreviation for intrauterine
contraceptive device (see
IUD
).
IUD
An abbreviation for intrauterine con-
traceptive device. An IUD, which is also
known as an IUCD or coil, is a mechani-
cal device that is inserted into the
uterus for purposes of
contraception
.
Most IUDs are plastic devices with
either copper or silver incorporated to
improve their effectiveness. One type
of IUD releases small amounts of the
progestogen
hormone
levonorgestrel
and is sometimes known as an intra-
uterine system (IUS). IUDs are believed
to inhibit the implantation of a fertil-
ized egg in the wall of the uterus (see
implantation, egg
).
Women who have been pregnant are
less likely to have complications than
women who have never been pregnant.
For example, they may experience less
pain on insertion and have lighter men-
strual flow and lower expulsion rates.
IUDs are usually not recommended for
women with
fibroids
or an irregular uter-
ine cavity. If menstrual flow is heavy, or
there is a history or increased risk of
pelvic inflammatory disease
(PID), a pro-
gestogen IUD may be recommended.
Rarely, pregnancy can occur, although
IUDs seldom cause problems and can be
removed. Nonprogestogen IUDs increase
the risk of PID, which can lead to per-
manent infertility. A rare complication
of IUD use is perforation of the uterus,
which most commonly occurs at the
time of insertion.
IVF
See
in vitro fertilization.
IVU
The abbreviation for
intravenous
urography
(an X-ray imaging technique
for visualizing the urinary tract).
IUD IN POSITION
An IUD is inserted through the vagina
and cervix into the uterine cavity. Once
in position, an IUD provides immediate
protection. Most IUDs have a plastic
string attached to make removal easier
and also to indicate its presence when
in place. IUDs usually need to be re-
placed every 3-8 years.
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